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  • TV Antennas

    by Published on 08-28-2015 11:09 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Cell Phones,
    3. TV Antennas,
    4. Satellite,
    5. Online/MobileTV
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    We've known it would happen for some time. Nielsen said that they would eventually start tracking streaming video on major sites, and The Verge says they've secretly been tracking online video for the last six months and now have enough data to start publishing ratings.

    This is a pretty big step for Nielsen, ...
    by Published on 08-27-2015 01:57 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Cell Phones,
    3. TV Antennas,
    4. Satellite



    Why shouldn't you use a splitter? Because there's no such thing as a free lunch. Or, if you're into physics, remember that Leibniz proved that the amount of energy in a system remains constant.

    What does that mean for you? It means that if you split your antenna signal using a 1x2 splitter, each TV gets a signal half as strong. If you use a 1x8 splitter, each TV gets a signal only 12.5% as strong as the original. Because you can't split a signal without losing something.

    Oh yes you can use an amplifier to make up for losses, and that can help to an extent. And it helps too that it's not all as bad as it sounds to lose half the signal, which is why we measure signal in things like "dB" which give you a better idea of what you're losing. It sounds a lot better to say that you've lost 12dB of signal than to say that 87.5% of the signal you had before the signal is now gone.

    And that's the whole point when I say that you shouldn't use big splitter if you don't have to. Even though amplifiers help, they also hurt (which is a topic for another day.) The best thing to do is to keep as much signal as possible without needlessly splitting it. That's how you get the best result.

    There's no getting away from this simple fact either. If you think that you're better off with a 1x8 splitter than with two 1x4s and a 1x2, you're mostly mistaken. You're probably a little better off because each one of those components have what's called "insertion loss" meaning that you lose some signal just by connecting them, but it's not a whole lot.

    The bottom line here folks is that a little bit of planning can make a big difference. Rather than simply tacking another splitter on, replace small splitters with large ones, or even better try to figure out if you really need that large splitter. Plan accordingly and you'll always find that you'll get the best possible quality from your antenna, dish, or cell repeater.
    by Published on 08-26-2015 12:01 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. TV Antennas,
    3. Satellite
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    So, Sinclair Broadcast Group, one of the perennial bad boys featured on this blog, got a little worse last night. We're not the first to report it so you probably know that the largest channel blackout in history started last night when Sinclair demanded DISH stop carrying 129 stations in 79 markets. I have a couple of questions here.
    ...
    by Published on 08-25-2015 03:49 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. TV Antennas



    When something unexpected happened in the world of newspapers, they said, "man bites dog.' In this case, prepare to be amazed -- the government did something right!

    Option 1: Click on the image above to stream the podcast in your browser.
    Option 2 Search iTunes for "Solid Signal" (click here if you have iTunes on this device)
    Option 3: Click here to download the podcast in MP3 format.
    Option 4: Paste the following link into your favorite podcast program:
    forums.solidsignal.com/podcasts/solidsignal.xml
    by Published on 08-25-2015 01:42 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. TV Antennas



    Maybe, probably, but why would you?

    Personally, I would not paint an antenna. It's possible that it wouldn't do any harm, but it's very hard to know what's being used to give paint its color. Often times, a metal like chromium, iron, cobalt, or copper is used for bright, sharp colors and the flakes of metal inside the paint can make an antenna less effective. On the other hand, if synthetic or vegetable pigments are used, they're going to have very little effect on an antenna. As I said, how would you know?

    Here's the difference between painting a dish and painting an antenna. When people talk about painting a dish, they're usually talking about painting the reflector, which means it doesn't really matter what color is being used as long as the surface just bounces the signal to the front of the dish. With an antenna, you're talking about the signal having to make it through the paint and there's a very good chance it's not going to.

    Rather than painting an antenna, I'd almost always recommend buying a new one, or if the problem is that it has developed an unsightly black patina, you can use a metal polish to remove that. Just keep in mind that it will return and that it's not hurting your reception.
    by Published on 08-22-2015 03:50 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. TV Antennas



    Yeah, you can but...

    Indoor antennas work just find outdoors. In fact all antennas will perform better outdoors than indoors. The construction of your home actually takes about half the strength from TV signals. The real issue with indoor antennas, though, is that they aren't waterproof.

    An indoor antenna isn't designed to get wet, it's not designed to freeze, and it's not designed to get the extreme UV rays that our friends in the south get. Your indoor antenna will rust, corrode or short out a lot faster if you use it outdoors. Of course you could say that's good news for a retailer like SolidSignal.com because you'll come back and buy another antenna. But really, we'd rather sell you an antenna that you'll be happy with so you'll buy other stuff from us. So it's best for everyone if your indoor antenna stays inside, at least when the weather is bad. Don't be afraid to take it outside for backyard barbecues or whatever, but other than that it's a lot happier indoors.
    by Published on 08-22-2015 11:59 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. TV Antennas,
    3. Satellite
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    Image courtesy of socialresearchmethods.net

    The world around us can be separated out into two parts: The things we find important and everything else. We care about our families and friends, our jobs, perhaps the world around us, but there's plenty of other stuff we don't care about. Whether that's a nearby ...
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