THROWBACK THURSDAY: 3net Studios

How naive was I to think that 3D TV still had a chance? To be fair, I didn’t think it did, but when a large company says they’re going to start investing heavily, I begin to doubt.

It was October, 2012 when I filed the following report:

Could we finally see more 3D content? Four months ago, we wondered whether we had reached the end of the road for 3D. Since then, there has been almost no new 3D content on any of DIRECTV’s 3D channels. Now, there may finally be a little good news for those who spent the extra money for a 3D-capable TV. According to our friends at engadget, the companies behind 3net, one of the first full-time 3D channels, has started their own studio to produce additional 3D content.

All we can say is, it’s about time. 3D hasn’t been a hit in the market, and there are some good reasons. No matter who you are, you’re not going to look cool with 3D glasses, and a good percentage of people get headaches after wearing the glasses for several hours. Some televisions show 3D content at a reduced resolution, and after all 3D doesn’t add a whole lot to a comedy, concert or even news program; the technology is really best for sweeping outdoor vistas and special effects extravaganzas.

But… content is king. People don’t watch TV for the effects, they watch because there’s compelling content. And, at the end of the day, there haven’t been too many really great 3D programs… maybe you loved Avatar but there isn’t a whole lot memorable this year.

What makes good 3D programming? Taking 3D from a gimmick to a must-have requires good use of the 3D technology. Shooting arrows at the audience ten times an hour gets boring, fast. On the other hand, there’s no reason for 3D if all the action takes place in a living room. Hopefully 3net studios will find a way to use 3D judiciously for its best effect.

As far as I know, 3net studios never produced a single program. The whole 3net venture closed up shop in 2014 and the rest of the world didn’t even notice. Most major TV manufacturers stopped making 3D TVs for the mass market around the same time and honestly I haven’t viewed any of my 3D content in years. I recently retired my 3D Blu-ray player when it started getting wonky and I saw the cost to replace it.