Will a Wi-Fi Extender Work in an RV Park?

Mature handsome grey-haired man showing his blonde wife something amusing on his laptop in their garden

One Wi-Fi extender will improve the internet connection in your office. You’ll need a better solution because your guests want Wi-Fi too.

We’ve been telling RV park managers about Wi-Fi services lately. That’s because our Signal Connect division provides high-speed internet to RV campgrounds across the country. We’ll get to that later. Right now, we’ll focus on the question, “Will a Wi-Fi extender work in an RV park?” A lot of people are asking that lately. Chances are, it’s a group of RV park managers looking for an easy solution. We’re here to tell you that easy solutions aren’t always the best ones, especially when it comes to Wi-Fi for RV parks!

What Does a Wi-Fi Extender Do?

Internet connection gets weaker the farther away it gets from the router. A Wi-Fi extender is a device you connect to your router – either wirelessly or via a wired connection – to extend the range of your internet signal. This is great for homes, where the extender helps get signal past the dead zones made by walls, furniture, space, and other obstructions.

So, let’s say you get that extender because you need to improve connectivity in your office. Yes, it will work just like it does at home. That’s great for you, but it does nothing for your guests. At best, the RV lot that’s closest to your office might get some enhanced connectivity. But that’s a pretty big “might.” Chances are, they probably won’t. The question you should be asking is…

…How Do I Improve Wi-Fi at My RV Park?

If we’re just going to focus on equipment, I have your answer. You’ll need the right combination of wireless access points and extenders. What’s an access point? It’s a device that connects directly to your broadband router or network switch with an Ethernet or data cable. It transmits and receives a wireless signal in the Wi-Fi range, which is 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz. This lets you connect wireless to your Local Area Network (LAN) and the internet.

So, what does the right combination of access points and extenders do? It quite literally blankets your RV park with high-speed internet. So, there’s the answer for your campground. Just get a certain number of these devices and place them around your park. Sounds enough, right? Wrong! Something this important needs to be trusted to professionals. And the professionals you should turn to are…

…Signal Connect, a Division of Solid Signal

Yes, Signal Connect can set you up with the right number of access points and extenders. But even these devices won’t give you the best Wi-Fi for your RV park. That starts with having the best internet service coming in. That’s AT&T Dedicated Internet (ADI from ACC Business, a division of AT&T. Signal Connect is an AT&T Preferred Dealer, and we have a team of reps who specialize in bringing Wi-Fi to RV parks. In other words, we’re the experts.

The RV park team at Signal Connect does everything for RV park managers. We set you up with ADI, match your campground with the right number of access points and extenders, which are carried by our Solid Signal division. Your real also develops a comprehensive blueprint for your park. When it’s time to put it all in, we contract with an installer in your area. After one last troubleshooting from your rep, you’re good to go!

Get Serious About Wi-Fi for Your Park

As you can see, this is NOT a do-it-yourself project. First of all, you probably don’t have the time with the season right around the corner. Secondly, you’re probably not a wireless communications expert who knows how to properly install the right gear. Signal Connect is here to help you with the best Wi-Fi solutions for RV parks. To find out more, give us a call at 888-233-6597. You can also fill out the form below and send it to us. We’ll be in touch!

About the Author

Jake Buckler
Jake Buckler is a cord-cutter, consumer electronics geek, and Celtic folk music fan. Those qualities, and his writing experience, helped him land a copywriting gig at Signal Group, LLC. He also contributes to The Solid Signal Blog.